Wisdom of Life

IFIP Staff & Board

 IFIP BOARD MEMBERS

Amy FreedenPRESIDENT

Amy N. Fredeen, CPA. Amy is of Inupiaq heritage and grew up in Anchorage, Alaska. Amy attended the Gonzaga University in Spokane, Washington and graduated Cum Laude in 1996 with a bachelor of Business Administration. Amy is the Chief Financial Officer and Executive Vice President for the Cook Inlet Tribal Council, Inc (CITC) where she oversees both Finance and Social Enterprise Operations. Amy serves on Cook Inlet Native Head Start Board of Directors, Alaska Center for the Performing Arts Board of Directors, Make-A-Wish Foundation of Alaska, Montana, Northern Idaho & Washington Board of Trustees, as well as on the Finance and Audit Committee for IFIP‘s board.

 

 

 

Screen Shot 2012-11-05 at 1.15.49 PMVICE PRESIDENT

Jessica Brown is Executive Director of the New England Biolabs Foundation, an independent, private foundation whose mission is to foster community-based conservation of landscapes and seascapes and the bio-cultural diversity found in these places. Prior to joining the Foundation she was Senior Vice President for International Programs at the Quebec-Labrador Foundation/Atlantic Center for the Environment (QLF), responsible for its capacity building and peer-to-peer exchange activities in diverse regions.  Over the past two decades Jessica has worked in countries of Latin America, the Caribbean, Africa and Central and Eastern Europe. A member of IUCN’s World Commission on Protected Areas (WCPA), she chairs its Protected Landscapes Specialist Group, and is a founding member of the ICCA Consortium, concerned with advancing recognition of Indigenous and Community Conserved Areas. She serves on the governing board of Terralingua.  She has published widely on topics related to stewardship of cultural landscapes, civic engagement in conservation, and governance of protected areas.  Jessica has an M.A. in International Development from Clark University and a B.A. in Biology and Environmental Studies from Brown University.

 

Andrea DobsonTREASURER

Andrea M. Dobson, C.P.A.  is the chief operating & financial officer of the Winthrop Rockefeller Foundation, Andrea oversees the investment, finance, accounting, human resources, operating, and information technology functions of the Foundation. WRF is dedicated to improving the lives of all Arkansans in three interrelated areas of education, economic development, and racial and social justice. Recognizing the broadness of that mandate, WRF focuses its work on the people and communities with the least wealth and opportunity, using its resources to understand the problems contributing to poverty in Arkansas and developing a long-term action plan to address the underlying issues. Andrea is responsible for ensuring WRF generates sufficient revenue to achieve its programmatic objectives and maintains good stewardship of its financial resources. Andrea leads the Foundation’s efforts in mission investing, and provides support to the Finance and Audit Committees of the Board. She is committed to addressing the issues related to poverty, racial and social justice, education, and community development, particularly through sound fiscal policies and transparency. Before joining the WRF team in 2000, Andrea was the Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of Central Maryland Farm Credit Agricultural Credit Association. Her areas of expertise include strategic planning, investment oversight and financial governance. Andrea is a Certified Public Accountant with a bachelor of business administration from the University of Michigan. In addition to her work at WRF, Andrea currently serves on the Boards of the Neighborhood Funders Group, the Pulaski County Single Parent Scholarship Fund and the International Funders for Indigenous Peoples Finance Committee. She is also active with the Arkansas Compensation Association, the Central Arkansas Human Resource Association, Bible Study Fellowship, and her local church.

 

Screen Shot 2012-11-05 at 1.09.37 PMJames Stauch, Founder & CEO, is a community planner and recent foundation executive with nearly two decades of experience working in the field of philanthropy, on public policy in the Arctic and far north, and with Aboriginal communities and organizations.  He is recognized as a creative and leading edge thinker and implementer of bold ideas and initiatives.

Before founding 8th Rung, James served as Vice President, Programs and Operations, at the Walter and Duncan Gordon Foundation, where he managed its  programming related to the Arctic and far north.  Among other initiatives, James co-created and oversaw the revered Jane Glassco Arctic Fellowships and stewarded the creation of a Toolkit for communities negotiating Impact Benefit Agreements with the mining sector.  Prior to joining the Gordon Foundation as a Program Manager, James managed the Community Grants Program at The Calgary Foundation.  Previously he worked in the field of community and regional planning in the private and non-profit sectors, working in both the urban and rural contexts, including with the Praxis Group and Yamozha Kue (formerly Dene Cultural Institute). James is past Chair of the Canadian Environmental Grantmakers Network Board of Directors, a co-creator of the Arctic Funders Group and the current Chair of two organizations working to build relations between philanthropy and First Peoples: The Circle on Philanthropy and Aboriginal Peoples in Canada and the International Funders for Indigenous Peoples.

 

Screen Shot 2012-11-05 at 1.15.36 PMGalina Angarova is Tebtebba’s Policy & Advocacy Advisor. Galina was born and raised in the Lake Baikal area. She has several years of experience in non-profit management and a strong background in environmental activism in Burytia and Irkutsky region. She graduated with honors from Buryat State University in 1998 and spent a year in Mongolia teaching English as a second language. In 2000 she received a Muskie scholarship from the US Department of State to go to graduate school in the United States. She received a Master’s Degree in Public Administration from the University of New Mexico in 2002. She worked with the Red Cross, Project Harmony (a US non-profit), and the Asia Foundation. Galina is fluent in English and Russian and has a basic knowledge of Buryat, Mongolian, and Chinese.

 

 

 

NNCayuqueoilo Cayuqueo (Mapuche), originally from the Los Toldos community in the southwest part of Argentina, has been active in Indigenous rights work for more than 30 years. He participated in the First International Conference on Indigenous Peoples at the United Nations in Geneva 1977. In 1985 he participated in the Working Group on Indigenous Populations in the UN’s Economic and Social Council, which was put in charge of writing the Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. In 1989 he worked with the International Labor Organization to draft ILO 169, an extremely foundational convention for recognizing Indigenous poeples’ rights. Nilo was a founding member of the South & Meso American Indian Rights Center (SAIIC) in Oakland, California and was the founder and director of the Abya Yala Fund, which worked to support self-determined Indigenous community projects. Nilo is currently a board member of the Indigenous World Association based in Hawaii and an advisor and nominator for the Goldman Environmental Prize. He has returned to his native Argentina after 25 years in the United States and in international Indigenous activism in order to work more closely with the Mapuche people.

 

 

Screen Shot 2012-12-06 at 10.18.45 AM

Anne Henshaw joined Oak Foundation in September 2007 as a marine conservation programme officer in the North Pacific and the Arctic with a primary focus on grant making in Alaska. She has a special interest in building capacity for indigenous community-based conservation, co-management and international governance. Prior to joining Oak Foundation, Anne was a visiting Professor in the Sociology and Anthropology Department at Bowdoin College from 1996-2007, and director of Bowdoin’s Coastal Studies Center from 2000-2007. Anne holds a Ph.D. in anthropology from Harvard University and a B.A., magma cum laude, from the University of New Hampshire in anthropology. The results of her work have been published in a variety of peer reviewed journals and international venues including the Arctic Climate Impact Assessment and the International Panel on Climate Change.

 

 

 

Screen Shot 2012-11-05 at 1.14.53 PMPeter Kostishack is Director of Programs for Global Greengrants fund. He has worked for many years supporting communities and indigenous organizations in defense of their rights, territories, and natural resources. Prior to coming to Greengrants, he coordinated the Amazon Alliance, a coalition of indigenous and non-governmental organizations protecting the Amazon Basin. He has also been a community mapper, researcher, blogger, activist against mega projects, and consultant to funders and organizations on how to partner with indigenous peoples’ organizations. Peter has an MESc in Social Ecology and community development from Yale University and a B.A. in Biology from Harvard University.

 

 

 

Screen Shot 2012-11-05 at 1.14.22 PMDune Lankard, Founder, Eyak Preservation Council, Executive Director, NATIVE Conservancy Executive Director, Fund for Indigenous Rights and the Environment. “The morning the oil spill happened was the day the ocean died and the day that something came to life in me,” says Dune Lankard, recalling the 1989 Exxon Valdez disaster. A member of the Eyak tribe in Alaska, Dune has spent most of his life as a commercial fisherman in Prince William Sound and the Copper River Delta. After the oil spill, Dune felt compelled to work to preserve, protect, and restore his tribe’s culture, ecosystem, and sustainable fishing economy. Dune hopes what he calls “social profits,” successful businesses that are socially beneficial, will transform the way people think about their impact on and relationship to the environment. He is developing a cold storage facility where local fishermen can sustainably process and directly market the fish they catch; the facility could jumpstart 50 new small businesses in his hometown of Cordova and serve as a model for indigenous people across the country and around the world. Every year Dune donates thousands of Copper River salmon to individuals, nonprofits, and other organizations to support their events, an avenue through which he is publicizing the importance of preserving natural salmon habitats. Dune believes his work in Alaska will act as a catalyst for environmental change at the national level: “I create effective models of change to empower people to positively influence their local economy, protect endangered homelands, and provide real solutions for energy and pollution challenges.”

 

 

Screen Shot 2012-11-05 at 1.14.09 PMShaun Paul has worked internationally for 20 years with policymakers, indigenous groups, business leaders, private foundations, and environmentalists to forge new models of resilient communities and accelerate the development of an inclusive, restorative economy. He is a founder of the EcoLogic Development Fund, and served as its Executive Director beginning in 1992 for nearly 20 years to direct grants and capacity building training to grassroots support and community organizations in Latin America empowering rural and indigenous people to protect and restore tropical ecosystems while expanding sustainable livelihoods. From 1999 to 2006, he led the incubation of EcoLogic Finance, an international social lending fund later rebranded as Root Capital that has now lent over $430 million to hundreds of small ‘green’ businesses and cooperatives in Latin America and Africa. Shaun also led the creation of Pico Bonito Forests LLC and served as its board co-chair from 2005-2012 to commercially restore native forests in Honduras in partnership with rural communities. He is a board member of International Funders for Indigenous People, a founding board member of Artcorps, and a long-term member of both the Social Venture (SVN) and the Sustainable Business Networks. His most recent venture is People and Planet Holdings to invest in social enterprises that protect and restore nature, affirm traditional cultures, and create economic opportunities for historically marginalized populations in the Americas.

 

 044Yumi Sera is Director of Philanthropic Initiatives at Amplifier Strategies. Yumi has over twenty years of experience focused on strengthening civil society organizations and managing innovative grantmaking and learning programs. She has worked for NGOs, development agencies, and philnthropic organizations, including ten years at the World Bank where she coordinated the Small Grants Program and Grants Facility for Indigenous Peoples. Yumi has written monographs on youth development, gender, and international grantmaking. She was the author of IFIP’s grantmaking guide and GrantCraft’s international grantmaking guide for intermediary organizations. As a volunteer for Conversations with the Earth Indigenous Peoples on Climate Change, she developed curriculum for high school students. She served as a Peace Corps Volunteer in rural Senegal. She has a Master’s from the Yale School of Management and a Bachelor’s in Psychology. She is as a trustee of the World Affairs Council of Northern California.

 

 

 

 

S. SwiftSonja Swift is a writer and social artist. She became involved in philanthropy circumstantially and out of an abiding sense of responsibility. She serves as an active trustee for the Swift Foundation, working both programmatically as well as on aligning the foundation’s mission with its investments. She has field experience internationally around issues ranging from agro-ecology to extractive industry conflicts and indigenous land rights. She shares her voice as part of the next generation in exploring new paradigms for philanthropy. Sonja has a BA in Cultural Ecology from the University of Santa Cruz, California and an MA in embodiment, trauma and place-based studies with a focus on nonfiction creative writing from Goddard College, Vermont. She was born and raised on a ranch in the central coast of California and currently lives in San Francisco.

 

IFIP STAFF

 

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Screen Shot 2012-11-05 at 1.16.25 PMEvelyn Arce, of Chibcha descent (Colombian-American) has been leading IFIP since 2002. She obtained her Master’s of Art in Teaching degree at Cornell University with a concentration in Agriculture and Adult Education, and was a high-school teacher of Science, Horticulture, and Independent Living for seven years. Evelyn was chosen to participate in the Donella Meadows Fellowship Leadership program, a systems think tank on creating sustainable ways to effectively make long term changes through leadership. Evelyn was a communications consultant for the Iewirokwas Program, a Native American Midwifery Program and coordinated the American Indian Millennium Conference held at Cornell University in 2001. As IFIP’s Executive Director, Evelyn brings a vision of philanthropy that is in accord with Indigenous culture, values, and spiritual sensibilities. She leads IFIP into its second decade of educating funders about critical Indigenous issues and supporting the philanthropic community in its efforts to increase funding to Indigenous communities and causes around the world. A tireless networker, Evelyn has brought together culturally diverse individuals and organizations through IFIP’s programs and events, helping to leverage vast reserves of resources.  evelyn@internationalfunders.org

 

EXECUTIVE ASSOCIATE

PYee Photo

Pei-Un Yee joins IFIP bringing seven years in the nonprofit field with her. In this time, she has worked to preserve the cultural heritage of underrepresented communities while advocating in protection of their rights and for equal access to resources. She has extensive experience in membership based organizations, serving as the primary liaison to chapters and membership for a national Asian American organization in her former role. Pei-Un has planned and executed multiple programs and projects around leadership development, civic engagement and service to the community. She holds a BA in Political Science from the University of Michigan and received her MA in International Studies with a concentration in China-US relations from the University of Denver. Pei-Un enjoys traveling whenever she can and will forever be a Midwest girl at heart.  peiun@internationalfunders.org

 

 


CONSULTANTS

R. ChitnisRucha Chitnis supports the mission of different social justice and feminist groups that are using a gender and rights-based lens to seed and strengthen human rights, environmental and climate action in their communities.  She is the former Director of Grantmaking at Women’s Earth Alliance, where she helped to build and launch WEA’s grantmaking efforts in South Asia and Mexico. Rucha’s interests include photography, poetry and writing, especially to highlight the power and potency of grassroots women to promote sustainable development in their communities and create just alternatives. Rucha has a masters in Sociology from University of Mumbai and Masters in Journalism from Ohio University. She is an advisor to One World Children’s Fund.

Luminita Cuna is IFIP’s New York Communication and Outreach Consultant. She has a Master of Science in Sustainable Development with focus on Environmental Management from the University of London/School of Oriental and African Studies. She has several years of experience working at grassroot level with indigenous communities throughout South America and in New York where she has been participating in the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues since 2009. She was an instructor for Colorado State University’s online learning, teaching a class on “Local Communities & Climate Change Mitigation Strategies”. Luminita also worked for 10 years in Information Technology, including at the United Nations. She is using her tech-savyness to enhance IFIP’s website and expand IFIP’s online presence. Luminita studied International Economics and French at Mount Holyoke College, where she earned her BA. She holds a Graduate Certificate in Management of Information Systems and a Professional Certificate in Journalism, both from New York University and a Certificate of Community Development from Colorado State University. She loves IFIP because here she can combine her passion for the environment, dedication to indigenous causes and interest in technology.

Jennifer Tierney started writing as a reporter in Washington, DC, which led her down the halls of the US Supreme Court and Congress. These were the days of the Iran-Contra hearings, Anti-Apartheid protests, and the Sanctuary Movement for Central America. US politics consumes many writers, but an offer to be an editor at a human rights publication in Peru saved her. There an interview with mothers of children disappeared compelled her toward freelance journalism all over Latin America for next ten years. In that time, she brought the stories of Indigenous peoples into the international media, from news wires to newspapers. Later, she worked in communications for various organizations, from the Rainforest Foundation to the World Health Organization. Since then she has worked as a development writer for Indigenous peoples and other groups, always to support the struggle for human rights and social justice.

 



INTERNS

Bio Pic KristenKristen Collins of Paiute and Shoshone descent joins IFIP as an intern from the University of Denver. She is currently a second year graduate student studying International Studies with a dual concentration in Indigenous Populations and Human Rights. Kristen received her Bachelors in Political Science at California State University San Marcos, where she was a member of the American Indian Students Alliance and studied Aboriginal history during her study abroad experience in Australia. She has a passion for working with culturally diverse individuals and experiencing the native lifestyles of groups around the world.


 

 

FelipeFelipe Camacho-Lovell is currently a student at Santa Monica College with the eventual goal of receiving a B.A. in Philosophy and a minor in Global Studies. He is passionate about human and environmental rights and is determined to give his life to the struggle for a peaceful and healthy planet. He looks up to the examples of Mohandas Gandhi and Martin Luther King Jr. and believes that their model of nonviolent struggle is the way forward to bringing rights to all of the world’s people. He has interned internationally, in the Southern Bohemian region of the Czech Republic, at an Art and Sustainability summer camp, and has also interned with a professor at the University of California Santa Cruz to present an art exhibit on pollution in the world’s oceans. Felipe is fluent in English and Spanish, is working towards fluency in French, and is always looking to learn new languages. Going hand-in-hand with languages, he hopes to continue to travel the world and immerse himself in as many cultures as possible.

 

Donna Liu is a recent graduate from the University of California, Los Angeles with a major in International Development and a minor in Global Studies. Though she has studied a variety of global issues, she is passionate about both human rights and public health initiatives. During her time at UCLA, she worked with the Bruins Public Health Club to help educate on and promote active lifestyles and better nutrition among elementary school children. In addition to volunteer work, she is also learning French, and is fluent in both English and Cantonese.

 


VOLUNTEERS

Aaron Soto-Karlin is a Sacramento based social Entrepreneur. His current work combines documentary, community organizing, and research with agricultural and health cooperatives. In 2010, Aaron launched Carbon Tradeoff as a storytelling tool for social change, and a forum for integrating those most affected by climate change into the global policy debate. In 2009 Aaron was awarded a Fulbright Fellowship to carry out research in Southeast Mexico. In 2008, he collaborated with Ashoka’s Changemaker Campuses to found NGO Public Education Partnerships, leveraging undergraduate passion to build partnerships with public schools and enhance the role of Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore civic life. Aaron was a finalist for the Open Society Institute’s Baltimore Community Fellowship 2009. He graduated from JHU with a BA in Anthropology and Public Health. He was selected for the BAVC Producer’s Institute 2011 and the CPB/PBS Producer’s Academy at WGBH in 2013.

 

 

Like us!